Bolohead to King Kong Ridge

by kenji SAITO on February 13, 2021

Hiking Bolohead to King Kong Ridge

That once in a blue moon struck again this weekend as Team BASK and friends met up for a hike on the West side. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Waianae Valley

Waianae Valley

Thanks to Mike for dropping Analyn, Bill, Ferlino, Lilyn, Shirley and myself off at the trailhead.

Waianae Valley

Waianae Valley

Most of us put our heads down as we trudged up the service road, while some of us held their heads up high. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Waianae Valley

Waianae Valley

Time to leave the road and hit the trail that was …

Waianae Valley

Waianae Valley

… marked with yellow arrow …

Waianae Valley

Waianae Valley

… and bottlecaps.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Leaving the trail as we started our way up the rocky ridge. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Gaining elevation as we left behind the forest canopy. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Bill and Shirley scrambling up the ridge. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Turning around for views of Waianae and Lualualei Valleys and the coastline.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Preparing to assume my rightful seat … Photo by Shirley Gloriani.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

… until I was dethroned. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

The group preparing to traverse the somewhat skinny dike while holding aloft a GoPro to record said activity.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Activity recorded. Photo by Bill Yogi.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Making our way to the first hump on the ridge. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Now I know what it feels like to be on a short leash. Photo by Shirley Gloriani.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Lilyn climbing her way up. Webbing optional.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Contact with the fence line in the middle of the ridge. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

The burning bush had spoken and halted progress for some in our group that would descend back down to the valley.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Drone photos by Bill Yogi. Still waiting for mines.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Ferlino hopping over the fence. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Topping out at the not so bolohead rock face. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Ferlino pulling himself up. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Climbing down the backside of the rock face. Somebody said it didn’t look that high. It’s all about perspective. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Lilyn making her way down while looking for her next foothold.

Bolohead Ridge

Bolohead Ridge

Analyn and Ferlino leaving the rock face behind them. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Scrambling our way up the steep flank of the mountain. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Looking back at the ridge we had just traversed. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Following the sound to the waterfall. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Standing on the scenic rock or something close to it. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Climbing up the rock slide. One way. Fingers crossed. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Lilyn pulling herself up while trying to avoid a flashback.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

We soon traded in the hot and harsh conditions for a more refrigerated one. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Analyn and Ferlino crossing through the wetland. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Dropping down the fence as we crossed a small stream. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Following the fence line through the overgrowth.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

The end of the fence. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Walking on the boardwalk that cuts through over 1,000 acres that is home to native fauna and flora. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Lilyn leaving no leaf overturned in her search for native snails.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

We ended our hike at the highest point on the island. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Lunch in the drizzling rain. We soon moved to shelter to be fixated by a shiny ball. All that was missing was the disco music. Bill and Shirley soon rejoined the group.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Running reflections. Photo by Shirley Gloriani.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

The weeping wall. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Walking down the mist shrouded road during off peak hours. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Objects in mirror are closer than they appear, left to right: Ferlino, Analyn, Lilyn, myself, Bill and Shirley. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

Does this apply to ladders as well? Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

We should have brought our hardhats. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Mount Ka'ala

Mount Ka’ala

End of the road.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Going down the initial steep descent. Strawberry guava trees and faded webbing was most helpful. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

The grade soon leveled off.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Going down a small rock face. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Analyn climbing her way down. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Looking for yellowjackets and the primate rock. Luckily, one was a no show. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Scrambling up the slippery rocks to get a better view from the top. Photo by Shirley Gloriani.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

The resemblance still went unnoticed. Group photo on top of the pile of rocks.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Standing on the shoulders of primates.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Going down the very slippery slope.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Standing before the spirit cave which was formed when giant boulders landed on the side of the mountain. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

A couple of hikers hanging upside down.

King Kong Ridge

King Kong Ridge

Now we were flying down the trail like bats out of hell. Well some of us were, some were just trying to make it back before curfew.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Not all tree huggers are liberals.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Leaving the trail for the road. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Makaha Icy Ponds

Makaha Icy Ponds

The ponds were indeed icy for the three of us that took the plunge.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Crossing the stream where we took the less trodden trail to exit the valley. Photo by Lilyn Avendano.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Approaching the towers that were built in the 70’s.

All pau

All pau

The last picture of the hike. Fingers crossed. Photo by Bill Yogi.

GPS Tracks

GPS Tracks

Our ridge to ridge hike covered 9.72 miles with fun friends. Thanks to Bill’s family for picking us up and taking us back to our cars. Post hike meal at A&G Steaks & Things where we enjoyed Hawaiian food, live music and impromptu dancing.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

ferlino April 17, 2021 at 4:19 pm

Awesome hike and company as always. Thank you Kenji for your Awesomeness .

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