Aiea to Manana

by kenji SAITO on June 14, 2020

Hiking Aiea to Manana

Back for another grinder in the mountains. Misery loves company. I had a lot of them today.

Aiea Loop Trail

Aiea Loop Trail

Thanks to Jasmin and Art’s brother for dropping us off at the park before the gates opened. Group photo left to right: Chris, Aida, Art, Lilyn, YawYaw #1, myself, YawYaw #3, YawYaw #2 and Ferlino.

Aiea Loop Trail

Aiea Loop Trail

The group pushing off on the rooted trail.

Aiea Loop Trail

Aiea Loop Trail

Enjoying the easy part of the hike while it lasts. Photo by Aida Gordon.

Sunrise

Sunrise

Greeting the sunrise with a shaka. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Aiea Ridge Trail

Aiea Ridge Trail

Analyn digging past her double shot espresso cans and boiled eggs as she looks for her makeup bag. Photo by Tessa Bugay.

Pu'u Kawipo'o

Pu’u Kawipo’o

It was just me and the dolphin at the windy 2,441′ summit.

Aiea Ridge Trail

Aiea Ridge Trail

Approaching the power lines tower as the clouds settled in and blanketed the mountains.

Aiea Summit

Aiea Summit

Group photo at the 2,805′ summit where we found no views and no sign. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Ko'olau Summit Ridge Trail (KSRT)

Ko’olau Summit Ridge Trail (KSRT)

Chris descending towards the second power lines tower that straddle the mountains.

KSRT

KSRT

Making sure everybody was grounded to prevent any static discharges.

KSRT

KSRT

Starting our roller coaster of a hike.

KSRT

KSRT

Anne and Tessa going primate as they climbed up the seemingly never ending hills. Photo by Art Young.

KSRT

KSRT

Aida making her way on the ridge.

Mountain clinic

Mountain clinic

Tessa had some major bulging blisters on her foot; but with Lilyn’s medical tape and Ferlino’s magic hands, she was ready to get back on the trail.

KSRT

KSRT

Panoramic view of the Windward coastline.

KSRT

KSRT

The group maintaining social distancing on the trail. Photo by Art Young.

KSRT

KSRT

Ferlino sweeping the trail. Photo by Art Young.

Kalahaku Teeth

Kalahaku Teeth

Aida looking at the toothy ridge as it sloped down from the mountain range. Photo by Art Young.

White ginger

White ginger

Chris rooting out the aromatic rhizome. To eat or not to eat?

KSRT

KSRT

Looking back as the ridges seemed to keep the clouds collected on the Leeward side. Photo by Aida Gordon.

Waimalu Summit

Waimalu Summit

Tessa shivering in a space blanket. Who said you can’t freeze in Hawaii?

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

The group coming down from the misty mountains.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

And then just like that … the clouds cleared and gave us sweeping views of the magical and mythical meadows and points beyond. Photo by Tessa Bugay.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

The group sliding their way down to the grassy field. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Looking back at one of the largest meadows to be found on the Ko’olau Mountains.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Everybody finding their individual and collective 15 minutes of photographic fame in the lush and windy landscape.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Somebody wished they had that space blanket right now as she balled up into the fetal position. Photo by Tessa Bugay.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Our group photo on the meadow mound.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Leaving the greener pastures for overgrown ridges. Photo by Tessa Bugay.

KSRT

KSRT

Climbing out of the meadows. Photo by Aida Gordon.

KSRT

KSRT

Lilyn following the curvature of the ridge line. Photo by Aida Gordon.

KSRT

KSRT

The rise and fall of the hikers.

KSRT

KSRT

Looking down into Waihee Valley that are bordered by the twin sister ridges of Eleao Windward and Kalahaku Teeth. Photo by Aida Gordon.

KSRT

KSRT

The sound of the yawyaws preceded their arrival to the 2,160′ summit.

Waimano Summit

Waimano Summit

Group photo before Aida, Anne and Art decided to go down the Waimano Trail…

Waimano Summit

Waimano Summit

… but first, the mutually consenting butt grab in the mountains. Must be a female thing.

KSRT

KSRT

The rest of us climbed out of the saddle as the other three made their way down the graded trail. Photo by Aida Gordon.

KSRT

KSRT

Looking back at the assorted colored hikers making their way along the ridge.

KSRT

KSRT

Chris pushing towards the 2,660′ summit of Manana.

KSRT

KSRT

Tree envy?

KSRT

KSRT

Chris climbing up as we noticed the fence topped ridge line ahead of us.

KSRT

KSRT

I guess imitation is not the sincerest form of flattery. Photo by Tessa Bugay.

KSRT

KSRT

Following the partially completed fence line up the ridge.

Eleao Meadows

Eleao Meadows

Lilyn taking in the smaller grassy field.

Manana Summit

Manana Summit

Our last summit for the day. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

The group descending down into the clouds.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

Losing elevation as well as cloud cover.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

The fence sprawl has spread to the Manana ridge. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

Our last group photo at the halfway mark. Only 3.5 more miles to go. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

Tessa and Lilyn climbing their way down.

Manana Ridge Trail

Manana Ridge Trail

False peaks for daze. At least the trail was thankfully not congested with uluhe ferns.

Manana Trail

Manana Trail

We soon caught up to Chris who was napping at the picnic shelter.

Manana Trail

Manana Trail

Chris catching the sunset. Mostly everybody had to have their “Lion King” photo experience.

Manana Trail

Manana Trail

Time to bust out the head lamps. Night marchers on the trail.

All pau

All pau

Mahalo to Art who brought us ice cold carbonated beverages to wash the tiredness away. Shout out to Jasmin for picking us up and entertaining us with her usual verbal gymnastics. Post hike meal at Pho 97. They should stick with what they know best and skip the oxtail.

GPS Tracks

GPS Tracks

Our grinder hike covered 14.3 miles through weather and terrain that seemingly changed on a dime. Another fun adventure with good friends.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

Leave a Comment

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

ferlino July 11, 2020 at 6:53 am

great hike. Always a wonderful day with the group. Thank you

Reply

kenji SAITO July 12, 2020 at 6:15 am

Aloha Ferlino,
Yup always fun times with the group. Thanks for coming. Happy Birthday!
Mahalo

Reply

Wahinee01 July 11, 2020 at 1:17 pm

Fun times w/ awesome peeps. Never a dull moment. Thank you Kenji.

Reply

kenji SAITO July 12, 2020 at 6:15 am

Aloha Tessa,
Yes never a dull moment with the yawyaws. Thanks for your company.
Mahalo

Reply

Aida Gordon July 13, 2020 at 12:57 am

Thanks for another great write-up and for leading the group! ..if I had known the difference was only 1.5 hours or so perhaps I would have stuck it out. But all’s well that ends well..I was meant to do that segment a different time to get the views! ????

Reply

kenji SAITO July 14, 2020 at 3:00 pm

Aloha Aida,
Thanks and yes you guys had better views when you finished your cross over!
Mahalo

Reply

Jonathan Heskett July 14, 2020 at 4:49 pm

Kenji, Enjoy your site very much. In April, my hiking partner and I decided to try and do the KST from Aiea to Makapu’u before I move off the island in August. In the past 3 months we have done Aiea to Kulana’ahane, Pali Notches to Mt Olympus, Stairway to Heaven to overlook of Kalihi saddle, Ka’au West ridge to Kuliou’ou West ridge, and we came up the backside of Olomana from Waimanalo. (I don’t mention what we have done to brag but so that you know we are fairly serious hikers and not just someone who did Koko stairs and then wants to transition to the KST.) The only portion we have left to do is between the Pali Lookout and the Kalihi Saddle. We felt comfortable doing everything else on our own, but not this section. We are adventurous but try to be safe. You guys obviously know what you are doing as you have done it multiple times. Would you or one of your friends be willing to take us out on this? Would be willing to tag along if you have something already planned. If not, would be willing to even pay someone for their time. If you know anyone who might be interested—and is knowledgeable and safe—please pass along. Mahalo! Email is gi_jono@hotmail.com

Reply

kenji SAITO July 28, 2020 at 6:32 am

Aloha Jonathan,
Sorry for some reason, your comment got stuck in my spam box. Great job on finishing off all those sections. I can help you but it looks like you are against a time limit. I’ll reach out to you and best of luck.
Mahalo

Reply

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