Halawa Valley (Molokai)

by kenji SAITO on October 20, 2018

Hiking Halawa Valley (Molokai)

Met up with Analyn, Ani and Ferlino to fly the slightly less crowded skies going to Molokai this weekend. No TSA lines and lack of liquids rule makes it the only way to fly.

Hoolehua Airport

Hoolehua Airport

Landing on the fifth largest of the inhabited Hawaiian islands. We picked up our jeep and was told not to treat it like a 4×4. We then drove to the laid back town of Kaunakakai where we got our food and water from the farmers market and supermarket.

Highway 450

Highway 450

Despite the island having only one main artery, it took us quite awhile to find our local guide, Uncle Ray Leimana Naki. Thanks to Emily for the recommendation and others for their not so spot on directions. He turned out to be a very educational and entertaining character that started off with a talk story session as he wove palm fronds into sun visors for us while we got acquainted.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

We soon left, not soon enough for some, for the eastern side of the island where we made the winding descent into the valley floor, catching a view of the 500′ Hipuapua Falls on our way down.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Entering the privately owned valley that was one of the earliest settlements in Hawaii.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Unko testing the waters for us, hopefully not literally.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

We parked our jeep in the grassy clearing and started our hike in the verdant valley.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Passing through the terraced land and fruitful trees.

Surinam cherries

Surinam cherries

Low hanging miniature pumpkin shaped fruits in various states of ripening that are more related to the guava and mountain apple family than its namesake.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Unko pausing at one of his relative’s house. Nobody was home.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Passing through an abandoned home with artistically drawn murals on the sagging wooden fence.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Unko explaining the difference between female and male rocks in the forest.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Resting near large pohaku (rocks) that was carried and stacked by large kane (men).

Noni

Noni

The potato sized fruits that littered the trail can also be used as mosquito repellent as demonstrated by Unko who picked one up and crushed it all over his body.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Our first glimpse of Halawa stream that courses through the valley. Photo by Ani Lagpacan

Awapuhi Kuahiwi

Awapuhi Kuahiwi

Sunlight shimmering on the reddish pine cone shaped flowers.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

We traveled upstream to cross the more passable section of the flowing waters. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Unko offering Ana Puka his hand for assistance.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

When you don’t take Unko up on his assistance, you end up getting assisted anyway. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Unko parting the waters to show me which rock to step on. Yes Unko. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Approaching the thundering waterfalls. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Moaula Falls

Moaula Falls

Nobody could get close enough to drop a ti leaf in the water as the voluminous displacement kept us at a safe distance. Photo by Ani Lagpacan.

Moaula Falls

Moaula Falls

Basking in the powerful mist and power of the 250′ multi-tiered cascading waterfall.

Moaula Falls

Moaula Falls

Group photo left to right: Uncle Leimana, Annie, Kensi, Paulino and Ana Puka. Lack of time prevented us from hiking over to the other falls, so we soaked up these falls while we could.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Crossing without Unko’s assistance.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Ana. Puka. Word association was the cultural game of the day.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Making our way underneath the tangled thicket of hau branches.

Halawa Valley

Halawa Valley

Who wen cut the cheese? Annie!

5, 4, 3, 2, 1 ...

5, 4, 3, 2, 1 …

Unko counting down the exact second back to our jeep that ended our 3.9 mile hike.

Highway 450

Highway 450

Two beeps Paulino. I feel safer now. Thank you.

Highway 450

Highway 450

The sun was dropping down as we stopped at a scenic spot to indulge in another photo shoot.

Highway 450

Highway 450

Looking down into Halawa Bay.

Highway 450

Highway 450

One of our last peeks at the rugged coastline as we made our way out of the valley to drop off Unko and pick up Chris who had flown in on a later flight after work.

Hiro's Ohana Grill

Hiro’s Ohana Grill

Post hike meal at the island’s only hotel. Photo by Ferlino Carinio.

Molokai Hot Bread

Molokai Hot Bread

After we had checked in to our room, we went out and participated in the nightly tradition of getting hot bread fresh out of the oven and slathered with ones desired toppings at the towns bakery. We also saw Yoly there as well. Truly a small island. Goodnight from the Friendly Isle.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

Leave a Comment

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Ferlino November 22, 2018 at 9:14 am

Very nice trip and hikes. Great adventure! Brought back lots of memories of talking pidgin and Hawaiian including living our farm and ocean days in the Philippines. Thank you!

Reply

kenji SAITO November 22, 2018 at 9:39 am

Aloha Ferlino,
Yup that was a fun adventure with you all. Can’t wait to go back again!
Mahalo

Reply

Anites November 28, 2018 at 9:09 pm

Well written Kensi. ???? Great trip/adventure. Thanks for the invite!

Reply

kenji SAITO November 30, 2018 at 10:39 am

Aloha Ani,
Haha, thanks for coming.
Mahalo

Reply

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