Return to Pueo Falls

by kenji SAITO on May 18, 2024

Return to Pueo Falls

The Kona Low pressure system was still lingering around the islands like a bad cold, so I decided if you can’t beat them, might as well join them.

Makaha Valley Plantation

Makaha Valley Plantation

We all met up and parked at Lilyn’s friends place and took a group photo with the resident peacock perched in the tree behind us. These birds from India, first arrived to Hawaii during the mid-1800s and has since established feral populations on all the major islands. In 2009, a woman beat a peacock to death with a baseball bat in this same area. She was found not guilty. If you ever heard a peacocks assortment of sounds which ranges from screams, honking, cawing, calling, squawking, clicking, screeching and cooing, you would understand.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Waterfalls spilling off the mountains all around us. It was going to be a wet day.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Approaching the gated community of Mauna Olu Estates in the shadow of Kamaile’unu Ridge.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Fording the swollen stream.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

The firefighter assisting the barefoot hikers who threw their shoes on the opposite bank so that their shoes and socks would stay dry. On a waterfall hike. Things that make you go hmmm.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Somebody was excited to find paria leaves in the wild.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Passing a lo’i kalo.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

The nearby creek was cranking.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

What lies behind that gate and can somebody grab my sunglasses?

Kane'aki Heiau

Kane’aki Heiau

Group photo in front of the best preserved Hawaiian temple on the island.

Kane'aki Heiau

Kane’aki Heiau

Wat? Just taking a picture of the colorful bird of paradise flower native to South Africa.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

The running water was making deep cracks on the service road.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Straight from the tap. Unfiltered.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Holding hands so that if one gets swept away, they all go together. Teamwork.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Intro to mycology 101. Tremella fuciformis or snow fungus.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Waiting at the BWS pumping station.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

One would be hard pressed to not find any manmade structure, active or abandoned, that has not been touched by graffiti. Scott would beg to differ.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Not taking our shoes off again?

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

I guess not.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

This particular tree serves as a marker to turn up towards the ridge named after a primate that made it big in Hollywood.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Some stream are for crossing. Some are for sitting.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Crossing another stream. Who said there were only a few?

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

How do mushrooms grow? I’m glad you asked. Fungal colonies composed of mycelium, which are root like threads, are found underground and in decaying matter like dead trees. Damp and dark conditions promote the growth of mushrooms on the surface which releases spores to spread more colonies of mycelium. You didn’t ask?

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Somebody earlier was worried that the falls might be dry upon arrival. Losing bet.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

More stream crossings than you can shake a tabi at.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Dry.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Wet. Rinse. Repeat.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Fleshy shelf tree fungi.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Sighting of fungal fruiting bodies perhaps Marasmiellus hapuuae.

Banana Falls

Banana Falls

No pooling or harvesting of bananas today.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Looks like the same mushrooms you can find in your local supermarket. Don’t know if it’s edible though.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

There’s more than one way to climb a tree. Some chose easy. Some chose hard.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Or don’t climb at all.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Not all those who wander are lost. But it sure looks like it. Let’s turn around. Besides, I’ve got a Dyson Vacuum to buy!

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Scott scrambling up the moss and rain slicked rocks.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

High pitched voices announced that the flowing falls was near. Two got lost. One stayed behind as falling rain in a confined space was not always conducive to a waterfall hike.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Approaching the roughly 1,000′ multi-tiered waterfall cascading down from Mount Ka’ala.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Following the rapidly moving stream as we made our way up the slippery slope.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Getting closer to the roughly 300′ base tier of the waterfall. The spray and force of the water was very palpable.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Brown water was less than white water.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Everybody got their 15 minutes of photographic fame.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Group photo at the base of the thundering waterfall.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

The unrelenting rain forced our early departure so we made like the red sea and split.

Pueo Falls

Pueo Falls

Getting out of the stream and back onto the trail.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

What goes up, must come back down faster.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Back and forth stream crossings.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Walking through coffee plants that were left behind by the former Waianae Coffee Plantation.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Must be a female thing.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Colony of fungi that seemed to almost completely cover the bark of the tree.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Wash day. Just don’t get washed away.

Kane'aki Heiau

Kane’aki Heiau

360 degree view of the 16th century Hawaiian temple that was dedicated to Lono, the god of Agriculture and Fertility.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Not the view you would want.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

The sign marks the spot. Harvest time!

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Last stream crossing of the day. Wet from top to bottom.

Makaha Valley

Makaha Valley

Walking out towards civilization. Playtime was over.

All pau

All pau

Somebody ruffled his feathers and she still wasn’t impressed. Our waterlogged hike in every sense of the word, covered a little over ten miles with a fun group. Post hike meal at Coquito’s. Hearty food for a hearty hike.

Photos taken by Chico Cantu, Jen Odence, Lilyn Avendano, Marilyn Bermudez, Scott Dea, Tessa Bugay, and yours truly. Not necessarily in order.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers. One should also always let somebody know of your hiking plans in case something doesn’t go as planned, better safe than sorry.

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