Boto Bunker

by kenji SAITO on December 11, 2018

Exploring Boto Bunker

A chance meeting at a windy lookout lead me to wrangling an invite from Allison to explore a sprawling abandoned military tunnel complex. Analyn, Glenn and myself met up with her group, where we then consolidated ourselves into one van and drove off to begin our bunker exploration.

Entrance

Entrance

Some of us were blithely unaware of the hanging arachnid as we squeezed our way inside the pitch black bunker.

Floor envy

Floor envy

Every girl’s dream – tall, dirty and yellowish.

Black and brown

Black and brown

You’re not supposed to look happy when you’re being fried, unless you’re a chicken.

Follow the arrow

Follow the arrow

Stepping it up into the warren of rooms and tunnels.

Fire Sale

Fire Sale

The General Services Administration had this place up for sale back in the late 1980s. No takers. From the looks of it, I guess they had a fire sale instead.

Lever puller

Lever puller

Hmmm, what happens if one turns this lever?

Ground zero

Ground zero

Perhaps it’s best to leave some things untouched.

Bunker

Bunker

This room had the kitchen sink, but was missing everything else.

Bunker

Bunker

Is this the way out? So many exits, so many turns and multiple rooms. One could get lost for hours in here.

Shaft

Shaft

Climbing up to the pipe platform, where Elizabeth was the only one to climb up the 100′ ladder to spot any surface dwellers. Photo by Allison Banks.

Bunker

Bunker

Husband and wife team.

Bunker

Bunker

Gives new meaning to the term four eyes.

Shaft

Shaft

Queing up to go up one of the air shafts. Photo by Allison Banks.

Shaft

Shaft

Watching out for sliding rocks and Greg’s scolding. Photo by Elizabeth Lytle.

Shaft

Shaft

Exploring a longer shaft.

Bunker

Bunker

Drinking and picking. Photo by Elizabeth Lytle.

Bunker

Bunker

The arm doesn’t quite match the apparition. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

Bunker

Bunker

Group photo left to right: Jesse, Allison, Elizabeth, Glenn, Analyn, myself and Greg.

Bunker

Bunker

Walking through the suspended asbestos, dirt and pesticide particles in the air wasn’t too kind to our clothes, let alone our respiratory systems.

Bunker

Bunker

Following directions was not one of our strong suits.

Safe

Safe

The next time, I’m bringing a locksmith and the networks. Move over Geraldo Riveria.

Urinals

Urinals

No urine was released into the wild for the making of this picture. Photo by Analyn Baliscao.

Cots

Cots

Well if we can’t find our way back out, at least we have a place to stay for the night. Photo by Glenn Toyama.

Bunker

Bunker

The bunker sitting on Army property was used by the Hawaiian Sea Frontier navy command during the end of WW2 and seemingly abandoned 31 years later.

All pau

All pau

Descending down the stairs and leaving the bunker where we then drove back to an empty parking lot and was promptly sandwiched between a LEO and our truck. I guess he just wanted to get up close and personal. Thanks again to Allison and her group for showing us around the innards of a bunker that long ago outlived its original purpose, only to be repurposed as the playground for all sorts of folks.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

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