Horseshoe Bend

by kenji SAITO on October 11, 2019

Hiking Horseshoe Bend

We drove over two hours from the town of Hurricane, Utah to Page, Arizona to visit the “Diamond Head of the SouthWest.”

Cattle trail

Cattle trail

Going up the short, sandy hill that was filled with a steady stream of disgorged occupants from the nearly full parking lot.

Glen Canyon

Glen Canyon

Passing the gazebo halfway on the trail that offers the only shade one will find in the desert sun.

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend

The talk of the town. The social media town. Scenic view from the 4,200′ outlook. It’s a 1,000′ drop to the Colorado River below us.

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend

Patience is a virtue as requests to share the space often got lost in translation.

Scenic Viewpoint

Scenic Viewpoint

Getting away from the crowds.

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend

A view less cluttered.

Horseshoe Bend

Horseshoe Bend

Jasmin watching the river flow counter clockwise with miniature watercraft churning in the waters below us.

All pau

All pau

We shuffled back down the sandy path to our cars and then drove to China Buffet for our last post hike meal. When you just can’t get enough of a good deal. The drive back to Las Vegas was filled with double vision and multiple vibrations from the rumble strips. A big thanks to Jasmin for making the air, car and hotel arrangements. A week well spent exploring, hiking and having fun in the Southwest.

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

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