Pupukea to Kulana’ahane & Makapu’u

by kenji SAITO on May 27, 2017

Hiking Pupukea to Makapu'u

This is a story of one hike that split into two hikes. Ethan picked up Chris, Daryl and myself and drove to the end of the island to begin our journey across the mountain. The Ko’olau Mountain Range.

Pupukea

Pupukea

Day 1 – Saturday, May 27. We got off to a late start at a little past 8am, as three of us were sober and one was slightly hung over. The mountains are calling and we are coming. Photo by Kristina Eizenhofer.

Pupukea

Pupukea

Chris recycling a hiking stick from the forest grounds that would stay with him until the end. The very end.

For Sale

For Sale

Mother Nature is slowly taking her real estate back. Photo by Daryl Cacatian

Paalaa Uka Pupukea Road

Paalaa Uka Pupukea Road

Ethan passing the picnic shelter.

Sign Junction

Sign Junction

We soon left the road strewn with fallen rocks and trees for a trail strewn with overgrowth, roots, rocks and mud.

Black Junction

Black Junction

Preparing to plunge into the trail system carved out of the mountains by the Army and Civilian Conservation Corps back in the early 1900s. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Ko'olau Summit Trail

Ko’olau Summit Trail

Walking through waist high uluhe ferns on the trail. Welcome to the jungle, probably the most overgrown section of the KST.

Pu'u Hina

Pu’u Hina

Taking a short break amidst the whistling leaves of grass.

KST

KST

We soon dropped off the ridge to contour on the Windward side.

Geocache

Geocache

Hey, there’s a Tupperware party going on back here. Anybody?

KST

KST

Enjoying a brief respite on the ridge from the claustrophobic and cloying vegetation, which snatched my water bottle and in return, gave up my sunglasses from an earlier hike.

Green Sign Junction

Green Sign Junction

It was around noon when we reached the halfway point to Laie. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KST

KST

Breaking out into the more exposed section of the ridge and some sorely needed fresh air.

Malaekahana Junction

Malaekahana Junction

Covered with condensation and perspiration, we arrived at the gloved junction and dropped down to contour to the Leeward side. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KST

KST

Making our way up to the foxhole that marks the 2,240′ summit, only to discover that we had familiar company sitting at the top.

Laie Summit

Laie Summit

Somebody was drinking beer at the top. Somebody didn’t need another beer. Group photo left to right: Ethan, Daryl, Arnold, myself and Chris.

KST

KST

We left Arnold at the summit …

KST

KST

… and soon bumped into the ubiquitous fence line and another familiar face – Rob Johnson.

KST

KST

Daryl extricating himself from the ankle deep mud. A taste of what was to come.

KST

KST

The cabin in the distance.

KST

KST

Crossing our mud soaked toes that the cabin would be open.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

We got to the cabin around 4pm to find out that Rob’s group had already opened the cabin. The largest cabin on the KST was made smaller by nine hikers setting up home for the night. We took turns filling our water and rinsing the mud from our blackened shoes and feet.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

Some of us made our way up to the helipad to catch the evening entertainment that buzzed us on their way to Sacred Falls. Then we trickled back down to the cabin to cook our rice and chicken and beans and rice. Rice dominated the dinner table. Somebody was going to cut their toothbrush in half to save grams of weight, when somebody else pointed out that they still had to carry it back out. Light bulb time.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

Enjoying the golden hour as we settled in on our first night on the mountains. Earplugs muffled the noise pollution floating around the cabin while air mattresses eased our tired bodies.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

Day 2 – Sunday, May 28. Daryl enjoying the glowing sunrise from the helipad, while the rest of us made our bunks and breakfast. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Koloa Outhouse

Koloa Outhouse

When you got to go, you got to go. Never mind the smell. Pass the toilet paper. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

Rob’s group heading out to rappel Koloa Falls.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

We left the cabin around 8am to start slogging our way through the muddiest section of the KST. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

KST

KST

Leaving the fence line and gates behind us as we contoured on the Leeward side of the trail.

KST

KST

Punching through a stream of pungent mud that passed for a trail. No Spartan Mud Race this year.

KST

KST

Crossing an open field to regain the ridge.

Smartwater Bottle Junction

Smartwater Bottle Junction

Look long and hard at this bottle. Let’s not have another deja vu moment.

KST

KST

Approaching the fenced Papali summit.

Papali Junction

Papali Junction

Rain showers met us at the summit around 10am. No sign of the “King’s Slipper” from an earlier hike. Group photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KST

KST

Rounding the fenced corner to find …

Please do not pet the dead animal

Please do not pet the dead animal

… our lechon lunch? Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KST

KST

The fence line and gates served as a surrogate firebreak through the uluhell of ferns.

KST Junction

KST Junction

The rain went away shortly after we got to the signed junction around 11am. Time to put away our rain gear. Only to take it out later again. Life in the mountains. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KST

KST

Misery aka knee deep mud loves company.

KST gate

KST gate

Leaving the mud trail behind us.

KST

KST

The views were fleeting due to the drifting clouds, but what views they were when we had them.

KST

KST

Chris dropping into the fenced gully, whose streambed was remarkably dry given the wet weather we were experiencing.

KST

KST

Hanging on the fence line, our constant companion in the mountains, as we contoured on the Windward side with muted valley views.

Fence meadows

Fence meadows

Passing through stacks of fences and pallets that provided temporary shelter from the sweeping rain showers that came and went.

Boot Junction

Boot Junction

We arrived at the iconic boot junction around noon. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KST

KST

Looking out towards the Leeward side as we left the fence line for the ridge line.

KST

KST

Walking on the Windward side of the ridge as we got treated to stunning views of the valleys. Never gets old.

Weather station

Weather station

Checking the weather forecast. Sunny with splendid views. Guy Hagi was alive and well in the mountains.

KST

KST

The group queuing around the gate to get off the ridge.

Cline Memorial

Cline Memorial

Greeting hikers since 1978. Built to honor an avid hiker who particularly loved this spot and whose life was tragically cut short by a car crash.

Poamoho Summit

Poamoho Summit

Sweeping views of Punalu’u and Kahana Valleys.

Poamoho Boardwalk

Poamoho Boardwalk

Panoramic view of the recently installed boardwalk and Kahana Valley.

KST

KST

Switch backing our way to the cabin.

KST

KST

Panoramic view of the West side with the cabin, marsh and the WST in the backdrop.

Poamoho Cabin

Poamoho Cabin

We got to the vacant cabin around 230pm with a lot of time on our hands. Ethan called first dibs on a slowly leaking air mattress that somebody had left behind. We washed off the mud from our shoes, socks and feet.

Poamoho Cabin

Poamoho Cabin

Cabin life. Reading the gems of Darth Vader poems that were trying to pull us to the dark side. We filled up our water and fired up our stoves to cook our dinners. Hot food does a body good.

Poamoho Outhouse

Poamoho Outhouse

Chris trying to be one with nature or nature was calling.

Poamoho Cabin

Poamoho Cabin

Day 3 – Monday Memorial Day, May 29. Sunrise from the cabin.

Poamoho Summit

Poamoho Summit

Chris slippered to the summit to catch a solitary sunrise washing over him, while the rest of us ate our breakfast.

KST

KST

We put on our still wet, but clean shoes and left the last four walled shelter we would see in the mountains.

KST

KST

Daryl enjoying the scenic views of Kahana Valley while munching on the abundant thimble berries that populated the trail.

Pauao Junction

Pauao Junction

The long and overgrown Windward ridge that goes down into Kahana Valley.

KST

KST

Watching our steps as we made our way down through the false holes and eroded sections of the trail.

KST

KST

One can’t but be awed and impressed hiking through the most scenic stretch of the KST.

KST

KST

The morning sun was hitting us particularly hard as we made contact with the fence again.

Fresh cut fans

Fresh cut fans

Ethan harvesting fan umbrellas for the crew. Chris’s sickle did come in handy. Ethan would never mock his gardening tool again.

KST

KST

Leaving the fence for the trail.

Schofield-Waikane Junction

Schofield-Waikane Junction

We got to the junction with the Leeward trail that leads down to Wahiawa around 9am. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KST

KST

When you fall off the ridge, get right back on, with a helping hand.

KST

KST

The heat was somewhat diffused by overcast clouds, so we disposed of our fan umbrellas.

Waikane-Waiahole Junction

Waikane-Waiahole Junction

It passed the sniff test. Now for the taste test? It wasn’t even 10am and it was too early to be drinking suspect beverages.

KST

KST

The mass of hikers follow lives of bustling trails, while the minority of hikers enjoy lives of quiet trails. Besides bumping into Arnold and Rob’s group back at Laie, we would not see another soul until Kulana’ahane Summit.

KST

KST

Chris rounding the bend in the trail. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

KST

KST

Walking across a relatively fresh landslide that had wiped out part of the constantly evolving trail system. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KST

KST

Contouring on the Leeward side, that for the most part protected us from the elements.

KST

KST

Back on the exposed windswept and cloud covered ridge line.

KST Junction

KST Junction

One does not always follow the fence on the KST, there are certain junctions that must be navigated or one will end up lost and burning precious time getting back on the right trail.

Metrosideros Rugosa

Metrosideros Rugosa

The largest known specimen of Lehua Papa provided scant cover from the rain showers sweeping the mountains.

KST

KST

Following the fenced ridge line, where we soon dropped down and detoured into the tree of life pass.

Tree of Life

Tree of Life

Looking at the powerful example of wind at work in the mountains. A horizontally growing sugi pine tree. The views weren’t that bad either. Until the clouds rolled in. Story of our lives in the mountains.

Selfie Stick Junction

Selfie Stick Junction

Leaving the sprawling fence line behind us at 1230pm. It’s just a matter of time before the necessary eyesore continues its march on the KST, which also seems to be pushing the pigs ahead of the fence.

KST

KST

Passing through the notch in the mountains.

Cryptomeria

Cryptomeria

Contrary to popular belief, there are several groves of these Japanese Sugi Pine Trees sprinkled throughout the mountains. Besides the ones at your local nursery. :)

KST

KST

We skirted the pine trees and crossed the trickling stream to make our way up the hill.

Kipapa Summit

Kipapa Summit

Can we just crash and camp here? It was only 1:30pm, so we decided to change the schedule and push on. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Ko'olau Summit Ridge Trail

Ko’olau Summit Ridge Trail

Leaving the contours and switchbacks behind us. It was just straight up punishing hills and ridges ahead of us.

Waiahole Middle Junction

Waiahole Middle Junction

Passing the overgrown Windward ridge from hell that none of us would repeat again under any conditions.

KSRT

KSRT

The scale of the mountainous terrain was more than equal to the physical exertion needed to traverse the hilly ridges.

Lost & Found

Lost & Found

Where is my GoPro? Chris and Daryl backtracked to retrieve Daryl’s GoPro that he had left on an earlier spot on the ridge.

Waiawa Gap

Waiawa Gap

Threading our way down into the heavily vegetated gap.

Waiawa Gap

Waiawa Gap

Minding the buzzing bees in the notch.

Waiawa Gap

Waiawa Gap

Pushing up the short but steep climb out of the notch.

Waiawa Gap

Waiawa Gap

Enjoying the stunning scenery wrapped around us at a little past 4pm.

Waiawa Gap

Waiawa Gap

Looking back at the rollercoaster of a ridge ride. More to come. Keep your feet on the trail and your hands in front of you.

KSRT

KSRT

Enjoying the short stretch of flat and wide open ridge line. Mountain and ocean views included.

KSRT

KSRT

Concentrating on wading through the waist high overgrowth on the trail as we had no views to distract us.

The Corner

The Corner

Dropping down to our campsite around 6pm. Ethan had surged ahead to Manana for the night. We noticed a lot of pig rooting activity in the area and checked our water supply and decided not to replenish our water, despite having steripens in stock.

Camp Corner

Camp Corner

Goodnight from Camp Corner. Pounding rain kept the grounds wet and air mattresses kept our bodies insulated from the damp grounds.

The Corner

The Corner

Day 4 – Tuesday, May 30. It was wash day in the mountains. The smell of rain hung in the mountains.

KSRT

KSRT

Leaving the soggy camp grounds in our squishy shoes a little past 8am.

KSRT

KSRT

We got disoriented in the clouds and “explored” in the dew dropped tree lined ridge until we found the trail.

KSRT

KSRT

Approaching the socked in summit of Manana to meet up with Ethan.

Manana Summit

Manana Summit

We arrived at the 2,660′ summit around 9am to recover the water bottles that Chris had stashed earlier. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

Pu'u Eleao

Pu’u Eleao

Dropping down from the rain kissed summit, we walked through the bowl shaped grassy meadows before getting back on the ridge line. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Working our way back to the ridge line.

KSRT

KSRT

The elevating mountainous views kept us grounded on the trail.

KSRT

KSRT

Passing the constantly eroding and evolving ridge line.

Waimano Summit

Waimano Summit

Dropping down into the trail terminus around 1130am, experienced cloud blocked views of Waihee Valley, so we pushed on after taking a quick breather. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

KSRT

KSRT

The crew silhouetted against the clouds going down the ridge line.

KSRT

KSRT

Dropping off the ridge and into the mystical meadows a little past 1pm.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Chris fishing for water that was sprinkled with floating bugs. Double filtered. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Group photo at the edge of the mythical meadows.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Ethan heading up to the summit.

Waimalu Meadows

Waimalu Meadows

Leaving the meadow oasis in the middle of the mountain range was harder for some than others. Who can blame them? Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

Whole Foods Market

Whole Foods Market

Why eat gummy worms, when you can have the real thing?

KSRT

KSRT

Back to our regular programming. The rollercoaster ridge.

KSRT

KSRT

The sound of huffing and puffing was alive and well in the mountains.

KSRT

KSRT

The clouds came back to keep us company.

KSRT

KSRT

It was amazing to hear the cacophony of civilization drifting up to the mountains.

Powerlines

Powerlines

The best views for us after the grueling climbs was the power lines appearing from the clouds. Another couple humps and we could call it a day.

Aiea Summit

Aiea Summit

I felt every inch of the elevation gains and losses as we made it to the 2,805′ summit around 6pm. The hardest and hilliest section of the KST were behind us.

Aiea Summit

Aiea Summit

Can you pass the butane please? I need to cook my Rice and Chicken. Photo by Ethan Clavecillas.

Aiea Summit

Aiea Summit

Day 5 – Wednesday, May 31. Hiking stick doubling as a stretching stick for Chris.

KSRT

KSRT

The gusting winds snatched my boonie hat and sunglasses from my head and sailed them into the great beyond. Daryl lent me his fitted cap to keep my big head warm in the chilly winds.

KSRT

KSRT

Passing the plant protected enclosure on the way to Hell.

KSRT

KSRT

It was hump day in the mountains.

KSRT

KSRT

Rounding the corner to find welcoming Windward views.

KSRT

KSRT

We dropped off the cloud soaked ridge and made our way towards the rusting stairs of Hell.

North Haiku Stairs

North Haiku Stairs

Panoramic view from Stairway to Hell.

North Haiku Stairs

North Haiku Stairs

Our stay in Hell was brief, as it was not as hot as we expected. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Following the flag towards Moanalua Saddle.

KSRT

KSRT

Leaving Hell behind us as we made our way up the dilapidated and rusting stairs.

KSRT

KSRT

Daryl making his way down the ridge with the backdrop of H3 behind him.

Geodetic Marker

Geodetic Marker

The weathered marker has seen better days.

Red Hill Summit

Red Hill Summit

Taking a shoefie at the summit around 1215. No stashed water from the search years ago was left, but the webbing that Ethan had stashed was still here.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Making our way down the crumbly and eroded section.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Stumbling down the saddle, or at least that’s what somebody told me.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

The mountain tops trying to pierce the cloud ceiling.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

The clouds lifted to reveal the CCL building that has been drawing hikers to her since the mid-1950s.

Kulana'ahane Summit

Kulana’ahane Summit

We hit the summit a little past 2pm. I was spent and exhausted from not enough food and water from the past two days. My stomach had shut down. A couple we met at the summit, graciously offered their egg sandwich, which I couldn’t stomach so it was time to end the hike. Parting group photo by Chris Bautista.

Kulana'ahane Trail

Kulana’ahane Trail

Looking back at the guys contouring and climbing the Dirt Triangle.

Kamananui Valley Trail

Kamananui Valley Trail

Mahalo to Ethan for accompanying me down the valley to make sure that I made it down safe and sound. End of the road for us, sorry about that prime rib dinner and cutting the hike short. Thanks to Ben Hinders for picking us up on short notice. More importantly, thanks to my wife who let me take off to the mountains for this hike. I think she was more disappointed that I didn’t finish than I was! I still enjoyed my five days in the mountains with good company and great times. The company always matters more to me than the hikes.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Meanwhile, back in the mountains … Daryl making his way up the last chossy section. Photo by Chris Bautista

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Chris climbing up the overgrown back stairs to the CCL building.

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Enjoying a brief break with the stashed water and food. Photo by Chris Bautista

Moanalua Saddle

Moanalua Saddle

Daryl climbing the steep hill to heaven.

CCL Building

CCL Building

Nobody was around the WW2 building. They had the heavenly view all to themselves.

ET Call Home

ET Call Home

Coming down from the Moanalua Middle Ridge Junction, they made their way down to stop briefly at the defunct radar station for a better view. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Camp Tripler

Camp Tripler

Home for the night. Face time gave way to battery time.

Tripler Summit

Tripler Summit

Day 6 – Thursday, June 1. Daryl greeting the morning sun. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Bowman Summit

Bowman Summit

It was a beautiful but windy day to saddle up again.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Contouring on the Leeward side of the crumbly ridge. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Chris untangling the webbing from the vegetation. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Daryl about to do the dirty rope slide down. Photo by Chris Bautista

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Scooting down past the broken wave. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Daryl climbing his way down the first rock triangle. Photo by Chris Bautisa.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Chris standing above the second rock triangle. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Witch's Hat

Witch’s Hat

Standing on the narrow dike before the last main obstacle on the Bowman side. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Witch's Hat

Witch’s Hat

Daryl cresting the top of Witch’s Hat. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Camp Centipede

Camp Centipede

Don’t kick over any rocks, lest a creepy crawler goes up your leg. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Powerlines

Powerlines

Vienna Sausage break. Just missing the saimin.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Daryl walking on the narrow ridge fringed by abundant vegetation. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

Looking ahead to the crown jewels of Kalihi Saddle.

Bunny Ears

Bunny Ears

Daryl making his way up. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Can Opener

Can Opener

The classic photo spot. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Lanihuli Wall

Lanihuli Wall

Daryl making the steady climb up the flank of the grassy ridge. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Dirt Dragon

Dirt Dragon

It was blowing hard on the saddle today. Just ask Chris’s hair.

Kalihi Saddle

Kalihi Saddle

To paraphrase Sir Edmund Hillary, “It is not the saddles we conquer but ourselves.” Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Almost there.

Lanihuli Summit

Lanihuli Summit

Taking a short break. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Anvil

Anvil

Daryl making good use of all his gym time pulling himself up with the new webbing. Photo by Chris Bautista.

W

W

Playing Donkey Kong in the mountains. Well played. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Nu'uanu Saddle

Nu’uanu Saddle

Dropping in elevation, they shed the clouds and gained the views back.

Pu'u Suicido

Pu’u Suicido

Daryl contouring and climbing his way around the incisor rock. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Pali Puka

Pali Puka

Arnold, Ethan and Krissy climbed up to the puka to meet the guys. Photo by Arnold Yago.

Nu'uanu Saddle

Nu’uanu Saddle

Chris and Daryl dropping back down to civilization and more importantly, hot food. Photo by Arnold Yago.

Pali Lookout

Pali Lookout

Chris and Daryl hitting the pavement around 5pm after a six day hiatus in the mountains. Photo by Dale Yoshizu.

Pali Lookout

Pali Lookout

Shout out to Agnes Bryant, Amber John, Arnold Yago, Becca Frager and Justin Brackett, Christine DC, Cynthia De Lafuente Wolarey, Dale Yoshizu, Darlina and Junanita Cacatian, Derek Potter, Ethan Clavecillas and Kristina Eizenhoefer, Harold Viloan, Kathlea Kay Evans, Lee Shreve, Mia Garrison, Nandor Szotak, Scott and Dalia Bowling, and Shirley Hamamura who turned out to show their support for Chris and Daryl and more importantly for bringing assorted foods and drinks. :)

Camp Pali

Camp Pali

Talking story at the campsite that Derek Potter had found that was relatively protected from the wind and prying eyes. Photo by Arnold Yago.

Camp Pali

Camp Pali

Day 7 – Friday, June 2. Early hikers roll up their camp early. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Pali Notches

Pali Notches

Daryl climbing down the second notch. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Chimney

Chimney

The wind was blowing hard in the morning and they had discovered the webbing had shifted to the far right. Chris shed his pack and climbed to retrieve the webbing for Daryl. After multiple attempts, the webbing was passed to Daryl and the hike continued. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Nu'uanu Saddle

Nu’uanu Saddle

All the technical were sections behind them as they continued their climb to the highest peak on the Ko’olaus. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

Awaawaloa Summit

Awaawaloa Summit

A hippy hiker was their only company along with the cloudy views. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Ka'au Crater

Ka’au Crater

Chris at the top of the crater trail. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KSRT

KSRT

Enjoying a short break before the big climb up to Lanipo. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Looking back is always easier than moving forward, but not as rewarding.

KSRT

KSRT

Passing the powerlines. Almost pau for the day.

Camp Wiliwilinui

Camp Wiliwilinui

They hit the summit around 5pm and promptly gorged on dinner for four. Buffet in the mountains.

Wiliwilinui Summit

Wiliwilinui Summit

Day 8 – Saturday, June 3. Chris greeting their last and rainy day on the mountains. Photo by Daryl Cacatian.

KSRT

KSRT

Around Wailupe, Chris fell off the ridge and was caught by a tree on the Leeward side. Don’t fall at all, but if one must, veer towards the Leeward side which is generally more forgiving in terms of trees and grade.

Hawaii Loa Summit

Hawaii Loa Summit

Enjoying the Waimanalo views at the 2,520′ top. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Passing through a sliver of a trail.

KSRT

KSRT

Sliding down the eroded section of the trail towards Kuli’ou’ou, where they met a couple of hikers at the Bear Claw summit.

Kuli'ou'ou Summit

Kuli’ou’ou Summit

The usually crowded summit was eerily empty. Chris decided to dry his tent further down at Hahaione summit.

Mariner's Ridge Summit

Mariner’s Ridge Summit

Daryl at the abandoned lookout. Photo by Chris Bautista.

Tom-Tom Trail

Tom-Tom Trail

Looking out towards Rabbit Island surrounded by the blue-green ocean. It was almost more tempting than the mountains.

KSRT

KSRT

No photo shoots to delay their progress.

Kamiloiki Summit

Kamiloiki Summit

Crashing Camp Awesome to enjoy the first beers of the day, courtesy of the Caveman aka Marcus Griego.

KSRT

KSRT

Enjoying the view before setting off on the exposed and rocky section. Photo by Chris Bautista.

KSRT

KSRT

Dropping down the rocky ridge to find …

Makapu'u Puka

Makapu’u Puka

… Arnold and Mark waiting for them with a couple more beers. Alcohol and hiking go hand in hand, or was that foot to mouth? Photo by Arnold Yago.

KSRT

KSRT

Nearing the end of a week long journey. Photo by Arnold Yago.

Makapu'u Lookout

Makapu’u Lookout

A big thanks to Agnes Bryant, Arnold Yago, Christine DC, Derek Potter, Ethan Clavecillas and Kristina Eizenhoefer, Kath Pablo, Lee Shreve, Mae Christine Dizon, Mark Carinoso, Mia Garrison, Rocky Serrano, and Scott Bowling for coming out to see Chris and Daryl crossing the finish line and bringing assorted foods and drinks.

All pau

All pau

Celebratory congratulations to Chris Bautista, Daryl Cacatian and the walking stick for hiking the entire Ko’olau Mountains in eight days! Others have done this trek with and without company, with and without assistance; regardless of how it was done, an awesome accomplishment to all that have done it and will do it. Great job guys!!!!

Note: I have been made aware the some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

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