Anamolo (Reverse Olomana)

by kenji SAITO on October 26, 2013

Hiking Anamolo (Reverse Olomana)

Not a fan of hiking the same trail twice, Olomana to be specific. I asked Chris to show us the backdoor way to Anamolo or reverse Olomana, as he knows the route quite well.

Trailhead

Trailhead

We staged cars at the traditional start of Olomana on Auloa Road in Kailua. Then we drove into Waimanalo and parked on Waikupanaha Street, where further down the street Bumpy Kanahele and his Nation of Hawaii community lives on the 45 acres they got after their 1993 occupation of Makapu’u Beach. Group photo by Matt Vidaurri. Standing left to right: Bob, Chris, myself, Jasmin, Hiram and Matt. Sitting left to right: Rey and Brian.

Junction

Junction

Instead of taking the traditional Maunawili Demonstration Trail, we took the right at the junction to continue our hike.

Exposed roots

Exposed roots

One can either run very fast over this section or gingerly pick their way across the eroded and exposed roots.

Makai view

Makai view

Brian enjoying the makai (ocean) view after we broke out of the forest and onto the ridgeline.

Mauka view

Mauka view

Bob checking out what’s for breakfast at the Nation of Hawaii’s community, as we saw smoke going up into the sky. Could have been burning trash or smoking a pig.

Hello there!

Hello there!

The rest of the crew making their way up.

Ahiki

Ahiki

Looking at the backside of Ahiki, the third peak. Olomana is actually the name of the first peak, with Paku’i being the name of the second peak.

Let the fun begin

Let the fun begin

Arriving at the base of Ahiki. It was a couple of weeks since I’ve done any rock climbing, so it was fun scheduled all day.

To rope or not to rope?

To rope or not to rope?

There are ropes on some sections of all three peaks. Depending on your skill level and confidence, use them sparingly or none at all. What matters is being safe as you should test out all ropes before using them and even then, don’t rely on them 100% if possible. Because you never know when these ropes will give on you. It’s not a matter of if, just when.

You're almost there!

You’re almost there!

The buzzing bees kept us company as we waited for the rest of the crew.

That pesky ladder

That pesky ladder

I chose not to use the ladder as we made the final push to the top of Ahiki.

Top of Ahiki

Top of Ahiki

We all signed the guest book at the top. Time to get a new book as people are writing on top of other people’s comments.

Guess what we are supposed to be?

Guess what we are supposed to be?

Give up? It was Matt’s idea to mimic Shiva, the Hindu deity that has four arms. We had, umm, 16 arms.

That rock looks fun

That rock looks fun

Coming down from Ahiki, I noticed a rock pillar. What could that possibly be used for?

Giving it the old college try

Giving it the old college try

Who needs VRG (Volcanic Rock Gym) when you have the great outdoors? However, no soft mats to break your fall, unless trees count. Photos by Brian Leano.

Small rock, good view

Small rock, good view

Photo by Brian Leano.

How do I get down?

How do I get down?

The hardest part of rock climbing is going back down. As Brian asked me, “Why do you put yourself in these situations?” I still don’t have the answer. Photo by Bob Tyson.

Climbing down to the keyhole

Climbing down to the keyhole

Bob climbing down to the keyhole rock formation. Another one to climb! I still don’t have the answer.

Top of the keyhole

Top of the keyhole

I wasn’t about to do any yoga poses on top of the keyhole. Photo by Matt Vidaurri.

The keyhole is now open

The keyhole is now open

The rest of the crew making their way down to the keyhole. Now we were seeing more hikers coming and going. Olomana actually sees a lot of traffic, most go to the first peak and turn around. Not many go further to the third and final peak.

Leaving Ahiki behind

Leaving Ahiki behind

Bob climbing up to the second peak, Paku’i.

Steps to Olomana

Steps to Olomana

Brian walking over the natural rock steps that leads from Paku’i to Olomana.

Butterfly Bob

Butterfly Bob

As we waited for the rest of the crew at Olomana, I decided to photograph the fluttering butterflies that were around us. None would sit still for me. Bob then called me over as one landed on his hand and stayed there for several solid minutes! Bob has good sweat and odor or something!

Top of Olomana

Top of Olomana

The highest of the three peaks at 1,644′ elevation and the best in terms of sightseeing conditions.

Cover yourself! Have you no shame?

Cover yourself! Have you no shame?

Chris had ripped his shorts earlier in the hike and luckily was not commando today. I know the feeling as I’ve ripped my pants in larger fashion and still continue to hike in them. I have no shame!

Pine needle break

Pine needle break

Waiting for the rest of the crew to catch up.

All pau!

All pau!

Last group photo at the traditional start of Olomana.

GPS Tracks

GPS Tracks

The 3.88 mile hike was a nice fun day with good company.

Leave a Comment

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Joe Gronwald November 30, 2014 at 7:45 pm

We did the hike today and ran the keep roads and trails back to the start. 4 hours door to door. Great hike but I never look as comfortable as you on the faces! Lol

Reply

kenji SAITO November 30, 2014 at 9:05 pm

Aloha Joe,
Glad you enjoyed your hike + the weather was super nice today! Your smiles was inside! I got stuck shopping today!
Mahalo

Reply

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