Poamoho to Laie

by kenji SAITO on September 5, 2021

Hiking Poamoho to Laie

Back for a mud bath. Good for the soul and your body. Or so they said. Or was it you will have fun? Photo by Barry Lau.

Trailhead

Trailhead

A big shout out to Daryl and Edgar for driving us from Laie to the trailhead.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

The trail actually looked in better shape than the last time we saw it. Marked improvement. Kudos to the individual(s) or group(s) responsible for slowly restoring the trail back to its former self.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Crossing over another landslide section. Photo by Barry Lau.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Art passing underneath a testament to the raw power of Mother Nature as she constantly changes the terrain.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Looking out to the still ravaged trail. Photo by Art Young.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

It would have been something to have been witness to the raw fury that was unleashed in these mountains over six months ago. From a safe distance of course.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Scrambling over a couple small blowdowns. Photo by Barry Lau.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Leaving the maintained one for the unmaintained trail. What a relief.

Poamoho Trail

Poamoho Trail

Catching the fleeting views. Photo by Art Young.

Poamoho Summit

Poamoho Summit

Barry soaking in the sun while it lasts. Photo by Art Young.

Ko'olau Summit Trail (KST)

Ko’olau Summit Trail (KST)

Passing the escargot holding area as we crossed through the gate and the mountains untamed views. Photo by Art Young.

KST

KST

Contouring below the fence line and a very old landslide. Photo by Art Young.

KST

KST

Back on the fence line with windows of the views peeking through the clouds.

Boot Junction

Boot Junction

It helps to be tough as old shoe leather to hike this trail.

KST

KST

Standing at the crossroads. One way to the waterfalls and the other way to more mud than you can shake a shoe at. Tough decisions.

KST

KST

Group photo before going down the rabbit hole. The very muddy hole.

KST

KST

Barry experiencing the immersive experience of one of the deepest of the mud pits to be found on the trail.

Papali Junction

Papali Junction

Taking a short break at the terminus that also leads down into the Windward side. But that was not our route today.

KST

KST

Throw in a pinch of overgrowth and mixed with the mud for good measure. Photo by Barry Lau.

KST

KST

Looking out towards the Windward coastline as the seemingly monotonous trail meandered its way through the mountains.

KST

KST

Art putting the rock to good use. Never mind the rat carcasses littered around him.

KST

KST

Barry climbing out of the notch that signaled that we were close to regaining the muddy fence line that would take us to the most spacious cabin on the KST.

Koloa Cabin

Koloa Cabin

Locked up tighter than a drum.

KST

KST

Climbing down the steepest section of the trail. Photo by Barry Lau.

KST

KST

Making our way down through the bowl shaped depression.

Laie Summit

Laie Summit

Clear views all around us at the 2,240′ foxhole.

Laie Trail

Laie Trail

Descending down the convoluted ridge line. Photo by Art Young.

Laie Trail

Laie Trail

Making our way down the side of the steep cliff.

Laie Trail

Laie Trail

No side trip to the refreshing pool below us. Photo by Art Young.

Laie Trail

Laie Trail

Going back down the long rut of an eroded trail. Photo by Art Young.

All pau

All pau

Mahalo to the friendly farmer that gave us a ride halfway out the road.

GPS Tracks

GPS Tracks

Our muddy grinder of a hike covered over 15 miles through the Northern Ko’olau Mountains with good company. Post hike meal at Jade Dynasty where we arrived, some more dirty than others, to celebrate Narissa’s 39th birthday. Say what?

Note: I have been made aware that some hikers have been using my blog as a hiking guide and getting lost on the trails. Please note that this blog was made to document the hike for the crew(s) that did it. That is why some of my comments will seem to have no relevance or meaning to anybody outside of the crew(s) that hiked that trail. My blog was never meant as a hiking guide, so please do not treat it as such. If you find inspiration and entertainment from these hikes, that is more than enough. If you plan on replicating these hikes, do so in the knowledge that you should do your own research accordingly as trail conditions, access, legalities and so forth are constantly in flux. What was current today is most likely yesterdays news. Please be prepared to accept any risks and responsibilities on your own as you should know your own limitations, experience and abilities before you even set foot on a trail, as even the “simplest” or “easiest” of trails can present potential pitfalls for even the most “experienced” hikers.

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